Overcrowded animal shelters in central Florida


They are packed at the Halifax Humane Society in Daytona Beach. At one point this month, the shelter was caring for more than 600 animals. Adoptive families and foster families have helped, but even though the animals come out, more arrive “As soon as I picked her up, she climbed onto my shoulders and fell asleep,” Skip Wood said, resident. Wood and his girlfriend fell in love with a kitten and brought her home. They said it broke their hearts that they couldn’t take them all. “It’s terrible. Lots of animals are coming,” Wood said. “But not enough outings? WESH 2’s Claire Metz asked. “Not enough releases,” Wood said. The Halifax Humane Society was caring for 263 cats and dogs on July 1. Since then, another 366 animals have been abandoned and picked up as strays. time, so everyone is scrambling. The staff here are late,” said Christina Sutherin of the Halifax Humane Society. In some cases, people never returned after COVID-19 to pick up their pets. price, some are no longer pets, and owners have to give up their animals. “Rising prices and people have to make choices about, ‘Can I afford veterinary care for this animal,'” Sutherin said. Halifax officials said volunteers have stepped up to help with the animals and they said at least 100 cats and dogs are now offsite in the care of foster families. However, the shelter still has a comfortable capacity, although the staff never say no. “We’re not going to turn away an animal in need, so we’re going to do what we have to do to make sure everyone is taken care of,” Sutherin said. From Friday to Monday, all costs associated with the adoption, including microchipping and vaccinations, are reimbursed through a donation from a non-profit partner of Halifax Humane. After that, it’s $25 until the end of the month.

They are overflowing at the Halifax Humane Society in Daytona Beach.

At one point this month, the shelter was caring for more than 600 animals.

Adoptive families and foster families have helped, but even as the animals come out, more arrive.

“As soon as I picked her up, she climbed onto my shoulders and fell asleep,” resident Skip Wood said.

Wood and his girlfriend fell in love with a kitten and brought her home.

They said it broke their hearts that they couldn’t take them all.

“It’s terrible. Lots of animals are coming,” Wood said.

“But not enough outings? WESH 2’s Claire Metz asked.

“Not enough outings,” Wood said.

The Halifax Humane Society was caring for 263 cats and dogs on July 1.

Since then, another 366 animals have been abandoned and recovered as strays.

“It’s scary some days because we just don’t think there’s enough time for all of them all the time, so everyone’s scrambling. The staff here are running late,” Christina said. Sutherin of the Halifax Humane Society.

In some cases, people never returned after COVID-19 to pick up their pets.

As houses and apartments change hands due to soaring real estate prices, some are no longer pet-friendly and owners have to give up their pets.

“Rising prices and people have to make choices: ‘Can I pay for veterinary care for this animal,'” Sutherin said.

Halifax officials said volunteers have stepped up to help with the animals and they said at least 100 cats and dogs are now offsite in the care of foster families. However, the shelter still has a comfortable capacity, although the staff never say no.

“We’re not going to turn away an animal in need, so we’re going to do what we have to do to make sure everyone is taken care of,” Sutherin said.

From Friday to Monday, all costs associated with adoption, which include microchipping and vaccinations, are waived thanks to a donation from a non-profit partner of Halifax Humane.

After that, it’s $25 until the end of the month.

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